Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Mastered.com- The Savile Row Coat



I am often asked where people can go who wish to learn tailoring and I don't often have much to tell them.

There is so little by way of educational material available to the aspiring tailor, and my feelings on this are mixed. I really do think it's a craft that is best learnt at the hands of an experienced teacher so the few books available should be used as guides for someone undergoing an apprenticeship and not for those who wish to teach themselves. That said, not everyone has access to an experienced tailor and I suppose they have no choice but to turn to the scant material available so the latest arrival to the self-tutelage sphere will be welcome to many.

Andrew Ramroop, of the justly famous Maurice Sedwell of Savile Row has teamed up with Mastered.com to produce an online, self-guided course in tailoring. Video lessons and some very handsome photography are provided along with supporting print material. In a smart move, Mr. Ramroop shows a technique, then his assistant does it. This gives the viewer the benefit of seeing an experienced master do, and then seeing some of the mistakes that he or she is likely to make and teh corrections as suggested by the teacher. Of course, not every possible misstep is covered, but students are encouraged to upload photos or other evidence of their work for evaluation by Mr. Ramroop. Certainly not failsafe but better than a book alone.

So far the site has been fairly quiet but I imagine that once more students sign up there will be more discussion, and I look forward to seeing future lessons.

The Savile Row Coat

StumbleUpon.com

6 comments:

Marysia said...

Hi Jeffrey, Marysia here,
I have been looking into this and am saving up to take this course........Having been early retired but so wanting to learn about tailoring this seemed to be my best option. No tailor where I live is keen to allow a woman of my age become an apprentice!!
I always talk about your amazing buttonholes and how I wish I was 30 years younger and could go through an apprenticeship learning from a master.....the video classes will be the closest some of us will come to.......but hey Jeffrey what about a fabulous book or videos from you......There would be a huge queue.

Anonymous said...

Tailoring books by Stanley Hostek give detailed instructions on how to use classic tailoring techniques to make a coat and pants.

Caroline said...

I would love to take this course - the instructor seems like he has a huge amount of invaluable information to share. It's over my budget right now. I'm a freelance writer, so I appreciate that they are asking for what they think this course is worth - it's hard to get paid what you deserve these days. I hope enough people sign up to make it worthwhile and maybe eventually there will be a way to do a "diffusion" level version of the course.

Anonymous said...

I completely agree with J about this. The books and material available out there is best taken as a tutorial AFTER you already have a knowledge base of hand sewing and hopefully, some idea of how suits get put together.

I've heard of Mr. Ramroop's online course and have had a brief moment of wanting to subscribe. However, the ideas presented are as J describe, better in tandem. It would be the same as a novice, or worse, someone with no previous experience reading the cutter and tailor forum. You'd become lost and then discouraged. This doesn't help new and passionate people learning and preserving the trade

Marysia said...

Hi
I did original train as a teacher in dressmaking and tailoring and the people at Mastered.com assure me that I should be at a level capable of completing this course.....however,I am concerned as it would be an expensive experience if I fail the course.....

Aiden smith said...

Hello,
this blog may be useful at starting level of learn tailoring. I want to say that Tailoring is a skill and not easy task for all.I also try to learn from Bangkok Tailors but didn't get mastery. Bangkok tailors are not profession teacher but really good tailors.

Post a Comment